Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Indigenous Women's Delegation in Switzerland Photos -- Camp Zürich Divest Credit Suisse

Camp Zürich Divest Credit SuisseWECAN International Delegation
Photos by Sara Juanita Jumping Eagle, Dakota, and Michelle Cook, Dine'

Monique Michelle Verdin, Houma Councilwoman, on right, demanding
an end to financing of fossil fuels. Verdin is battling the Bayou Bridge 
Pipeline on the Louisiana Gulf Coast. Michelle Cook on left.


Sara Juanita Jumping Eagle, Dakota, and
Waste Win Young, both of Standing Rock, (with friend in center)
battling the Dakota Access Pipeline, its owner, Energy
Transfer Partners, and those who finance and invest in
dirty fuels.
"Indigenous Women’s Delegation - holding Suisse and German financial institutions accountable for their investments in unethical corporations and projects such as Energy Transfer Partners, Dakota Access Pipeline, Bayou Bridge Pipeline, Transmountain pipeline expansion project, and Kinder Morgan." Sara Juanita Jumping Eagle.



Waste Win Young, Dakota of Standing Rock, said, "Zürich and Bern today. Had an action in front of CreditSuisse with Greenpeace. We met with the ministry of foreign affairs and the ministry of labor and economics in Bern. Swiss financial institutions are investing millions of dollars in fossil fuel projects worldwide with companies who are committing indigenous and human rights abuses. Their quality of life comes at the expense of our communities and our sacred places."

"Warrior women demand accountability from Credit Suisse
 for Indigenous Human Rights violations!" -- Michelle Cook


Swiss banks lead dirty fuel financing in Europe

Greenpeace Switzerland published a new report today that revealed that, per capita, Swiss banks provide more funding for fossil fuel companies than any other European country. Read more:
https://www.greenpeace.org/international/press-release/16141/indigenous-people-and-swiss-pensioners-challenge-switzerlands-biggest-banks-on-oil-pipeline-funding/

WECAN Spring 2018 Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegates comprise both frontline community leaders, and tribal officials who serve or have served in official capacities for their Tribal Nations, including - Charlene Aleck (Elected councillor for Tsleil Waututh Nation, Sacred Trust Initiative, Canada); Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota pediatrician, living and working on the Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota); Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer); Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); and Monique Verdin (Member of south Louisiana’s United Houma Nation Tribal Council and the Another Gulf Is Possible Collaborative) - with Osprey Orielle Lake (WECAN International Executive Director and Delegation organizer).

CONTACT:
Emily Arasim (general inquiries) – emily@wecaninternational.org, +1(505)920-0153
Michelle Cook (general inquiries) - divestinvestprotect@gmail.com
Osprey Orielle Lake (urgent inquiries in Europe) – osprey@wecaninternational.org, +1(415)722-2104


Read more about the delegation:

https://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2018/04/indigenous-womens-delegation-to-europe.html

Mohawk Nation News 'Hey, Chief, What's Your Price?'

L'eau Est La Vie Camp -- Occupying Bayou Bridge Pipeline in Louisiana





BREAKING: Day 2 of occupying the Bayou Bridge Pipeline easement in Youngsville, Louisiana. Water protectors from L'eau est la Vie resistance camp and landowners are fighting together to stop ETP and the Bayou Bridge Pipeline. Construction has been stopped all morning and is expected to be shut down all day. #StopBBP #StopETP #NoBBP#NoBayouBridgePipeline #NoBayouBridge (April 25, 2018)

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Mohawk Nation News 'AFN Terrorism'

AFN TERRORISM


Please post & distribute.
MNN. Apr. 24, 2018. The Assembly of First Nations, the national, provincial and territorial INDIAN organizations and band and tribal councils are terrorist organizations. They use terror as a weapon to help eradicate all native people. Violence and threats are calculated to attain political and economic goals through coercion and fear.  AFN and the others belong on the list of agents of repression who carry out the thuggery for the corporate cartel of the invaders. 

Indigenous Women Urge Divestment in Switzerland -- 'No Fossil Fuel Financing'

Women's Earth and Climate Action Network
·
Indigenous Women Urge Divestment in Switzerland -- 'No Fossil Fuel Financing'



By Women's Earth and Climate Action Network

Censored News


ZURICH (April 23, 2018) -- The third Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Europe was in Zurich, Switzerland today, meeting with UBS bank to advocate against unethical financing of fossil fuel projects due to Indigenous and human rights violations, and dangers to the health of the global climate.
Delegates are speaking out about Energy Transfer Partners’ Dakota Access and Bayou Bridge Pipelines; Kinder Morgan’s TransMountain Pipeline; and Enbridge’s Line 3 Pipeline, and calling for a just transition now!

(April 24) Delegation in Frankfurt Germany today meeting w/ Deutsche Bank, protecting water, air, and climate and calling for respect for Indigenous right to free,prior and informed consent. It's time for financial institutions to be accountable and for justice to be served.

Spring 2018 Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegates comprise both frontline community leaders, and tribal officials who serve or have served in official capacities for their Tribal Nations, including - Charlene Aleck (Elected councillor for Tsleil Waututh Nation, Sacred Trust Initiative, Canada); Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota pediatrician, living and working on the Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota); Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer); Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); and Monique Verdin (Member of south Louisiana’s United Houma Nation Tribal Council and the Another Gulf Is Possible Collaborative) - with Osprey Orielle Lake (WECAN International Executive Director and Delegation organizer).

CONTACT:
Emily Arasim (general inquiries) – emily@wecaninternational.org, +1(505)920-0153
Michelle Cook (general inquiries) - divestinvestprotect@gmail.com
Osprey Orielle Lake (urgent inquiries in Europe) – osprey@wecaninternational.org, +1(415)722-2104


Read more about the delegation:
https://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2018/04/indigenous-womens-delegation-to-europe.html

Thank you for your support for food delivery by O'odham VOICE Against the Wall

Ofelia Rivas, O'odham, purchasing emergency food for O'odham on the border. Photo copyright Jeff Hendricks
O'odham Emergency Food Delivered on Border by O'odham VOICE Against the Wall

Photos and article by Ofelia Rivas
O'odham VOICE against the Wall
Censored News
French translation by Christine Prat

O'odham on the south side of the US/ Mexico international boundary are impacted by recent US Border Patrol restrictions at the San Miguel Gate, a traditional O'odham route.
Community members from Kom Wahia, Wo' osan and Kuwit Wahia are in need of immediate assistance. 
O'odham VOICE Against the WALL made an immediate appeal for assistance to purchase food and delivered it to the families. Thank you for the $200. that was raised. The food was delivered on April 19, 2018.
This effort will continue until a sustainable solution is made. The three communities do not have electricity, Two communities have wells with available water, one community does not have a well and needs to haul water. The water hauling truck has broken down recently. The communities need supplies such as lamp oil and kerosene and propane. Also household supplies such as soap, bathroom tissue, other hygiene supplies, and matches and batteries are needed.
O'odham VOICE against the WALL
http://tiamatpublications.com/
Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.
Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.



Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.
.
Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Copyright. Photos and article copyright Ofelia Rivas, Censored News. No portion may be published without permission.

Monday, April 23, 2018

LIVE Border Patrol Agent Found Not Guilty of Murdering Teen -- Crowd Blocking Street in Tucson




Border Patrol agent shot through the border fence into Nogales, Mexico, murdering teen


Border Patrol agent Lonnie Swartz was charged in the October 2012 killing of 16-year-old Jose Antonio Elena Rodríguez of Nogales, Sonora. The agent is accused of firing 16 shots through the Nogales border fence at a group of rock throwers, including Elena Rodríguez, who was hit eight times in the back and twice in the head.

Counting Coup at the United Nations


'No Warriors Forgotten' Speaking out for Justice and Freedom for Leonard Peltier


By Tony Gonzales
AIM West
Censored News

NEW YORK -- The first week of the 17th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues ended on a positive note for the work done by the delegation of AIM-WEST.   AIM-WEST youth delegates Thorne LaPointe spoke under item #4; Chief Valentin Lopez spoke under item #8; and Ms. Jean Roach spoke on item #10.  

The AIM-WEST delegation also conducted a side-event (workshop) on Wednesday, April 18, in the morning to a overcrowded yet up-beat room. But it wasn’t until Thursday that the voice for Human Rights Defender/ Political Prisoner Leonard Peltier was heard loud and clear under item #10 (and response of solidarity overwhelming!).  So much solidarity was expressed from the floor for Leonard’s case after Ms. Jean Roach spoke that the Chairperson of the UN PFII Ms. Aboubacrine (Tuereg), had to hit the gavel several times to quiet the room!   (see video at 2:32:08).
The speaker representing Leonard Peltier at the PFII, Ms. Jean Roach, who was age 14 during the shoot-out at the Jumping Bull compound in South Dakota on June 26, 1975, read her prepared statement and before completing replied to a statement lodged by the USA representative on Thursday toward the NGO International Indian Treaty Council, for speaking about the incarceration and situation of prisoner Leonard Peltier.

When governments speak in sessions like these at the UN, an NGO generally speaking, are not allowed to reply, only perhaps in an inter-active dialogue setting.  The situation at the UNPFII precipitated by (the) previous intervention fortunately positioned the Leonard Peltier representative (already on the speakers list) to take the floor, allowed/compelled her to defend Leonard’s innocence in the shooting of the two agents by responding/slamming the USA statement, and challenged the USA to their own lies, lies, lies.   i.e.. they don’t even know who did the shooting.

I might add for your attention;  the beginning of this video’s UN PFII session the report given by the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, provides an excellent overview of the current role of extractive industries in a marriage with the military including private security systems (companies) working in tandem against human rights defenders; and worth an ear full!  

Finally, at the very end of the afternoon session see a plea by a Indigenous sister from Canada to the UNPFII giving testimony of how and who killed her brother as Indian lives don’t matter! 

Aho!  All my relations!

Tony Gonzales
AIM-WEST director


Mohawk Nation News 'AFN Eye for an Eye Psychos'


AFN ‘EYE FOR AN EYE’ PSYCHOS



Please post & distribute.
MNN. Apr. 23, 2018. Assembly of First Nations refuse to take responsibility for their part in the genocide of their people. They and their handlers live in beautiful homes, have perfect families, with club houses that look like cathedrals 
with spiraling lobbies that have alters called ATMs and banks.
Read article at Mohawk Nation News:

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Honoring Missing Indigenous People in Fallon, Nevada

Photos by Western Shoshone Carl Bad Bear Sampson


Add caption






Photos by Bad Bear Sampson, Western Shoshone

Article by Brenda Norrell
Censored News

FALLON, Nevada -- In a town with a history of racism and violence toward Native people -- Fallon, Nevada -- Native Americans gathered to remember and honor Indigenous Missing People, just across from the courthouse and police station.
Buck Sampson, Paiute elder, said, "Indigenous Missing People gathered at Williams Avenue and Main Street, Saturday.
"Good turn out this afternoon. Lots of powerful Prayers today, and the healing of some of the Women started today. They want to keep this prayer going everyday, especially for the talking circles and prayer circles in Lovelock, Fallon,  Stillwater, Wadsworth, Schurz, Pyramid Lake, Yomba, Reno, and Carson City."
"It was real spiritual and uplifting with good songs and singers, well represented by the American Indian Movement," Buck Sampson told Censored News. 


Copryight photos Carl Sampson, article Censored News. May not be republished without permission.  

Saturday, April 21, 2018

VIDEO Indigenous Women Land Defenders at U.N. New York



Tokata Iron Eyes, 14-year-old Dakota, is among youths who first brought attention to Dakota Access Pipeline threatening Standing Rock. "We are the new generation."
"We are going to change the world."
"The only enemy that we have is ignorance."

"No one knows what they are doing right now, because they will hide it from us." LaDonna BraveBull Allard.
"We must empower ourselves. We have a right to live."

"It is about the right of our Mother Earth. It is about the Spirit of the Water."


"What is happening is ethnic cleansing." Michelle Cook, Dine' "We have all been lied to."
"We are not going to be lied to anymore."


"We are using and abusing the land." -- Kandi Mosset, Hidatsa, Mandan, Arikara, urging alternative energy. Corporations are not providing the alternatives the people are demanding.

Watch live below:

FEATURING:
Kandi Mossett (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara; Lead Organizer on the Extreme Energy and Just Transition Campaign with the Indigenous Environmental Network)
Michelle Cook (Diné; human rights lawyer)
Gloria Ushigua (Sápara; President of the Association of Sápara Women, Ecuador)
LaDonna BraveBull Allard (Lakota historian, member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and founder/landowner of Sacred Stone Camp, North Dakota)
Tokata Iron Eyes (Hunkpapa and Oglala Lakota from the Standing Rock Reservation; Youth Advisor for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; Youth Advisor for Sacred Stone Village; Administrator for Last Real Indians)
Thilmeeza Hussain (Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; WECAN Advisory Council Member; Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives)
Event moderator, Osprey Orielle Lake (Founder and Executive Director, Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, WECAN International)
ABOUT: As a result of the dangerous intersection of colonialism, racism and patriarchy, Indigenous women around the world are impacted first and worst by the effects of environmental destruction and a rapidly changing climate. However despite all odds and against great challenges, it is these very same Indigenous women who are rising up, challenging the status quo, holding a vision, and taking action to build the vital solutions needed for a just and livable future.
.


International Panel, Second Panel on the Livestream

Mirian Cisneros (President of the Kichwa Pueblo of Sarayaku, Ecuador) "This struggle is about the women." "Those who began the struggle are no longer with us, but their spirits are with us." Mirian is speaking of the transnational companies, the extraction, oil, mining, and logging, endangering the Amazon. 
Thilmeeza Hussain (Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; WECAN Advisory Council Member; Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives) She describes how climate change is impacting her island. "It is climate genocide."
Gloria Ushigua (Sápara; President of the Association of Sápara Women, Ecuador) Gloria said she is not afraid to fight Ecuador. Her people are being killed quietly in the Amazon. 

Friday, April 20, 2018

United Nations -- Criminalization of Indigenous Water Protectors


View the Report 

Indigenous Resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline criminalization of dissent and suppression of protest

Article by Brenda Norrell, Censored News

NEW YORK -- Broadcast live from the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues event, LaDonna Allard of Sacred Stone Camp, describes how the youths at Standing Rock used social media, and ran across the country, and launched the resistance to Dakota Access Pipeline.

LaDonna, among those on the panel, describes the attack on Sept. 3, 2016, and how the water protectors were maced. She stood out in the middle of the attack dogs. "Blood was running from his mouth," she said of one of the attack dogs. "The young men came with their horses, and put their horses between us and the dogs."
She always thought the laws of the United States are just.
At that moment, she realized no, the laws of the U.S. are not just.
"I am really angry.  I watched some really good people get hurt."
The militia groups came, the military came.
They were shooting people, macing people.
Percussion grenades, water cannons.
"I watched very amazing young people stand up in prayer, ceremony and song."
The police engaged in military strategy.
Then, they brought in the military, attacking people, and they began the propaganda.
The newspapers carried the propaganda.
"That's when I realized money buys everyone's souls."
She said there is no law by these corporations.
"You don't have a right to build a pipeline outside my home," she said.
"Someone has to show me America is a just system."
Speaking of her Dakota ancestors, LaDonna said, "We never had a conflict with America, and you came and killed us anyway."
She describes how officials came to take her land.
"How many times do I have to start again in my home."
LaDonna said she knows the history of the land for 10,000 years.
"I have the roots growing right out of my feet."
"I will stand until I die there."
Indigenous Peoples are holding on for the world, she said of the protection for all liing things and Mother Earth.
"We want the world to live."
"There's no more time."
"It is now you must stand up."


Video above by Cultural Survival Michelle Cook (Dine’) speaks about Standing Rock! "We are asking for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission regarding Standing Rock...Media plays a role in the criminalization of Indigenous Peoples because it desensitizes people."

Michelle Cook, Dine' attorney and panelist, was among those who went to stand with LaDonna.

"We are going to keep fighting for justice," Michelle said during her presentation.
Michelle describes how she helped begin the Water Protectors Legal Collective, in an army tent at Standing Rock.
She describes how helicopters circled overhead, and there were children in the camp, with nothing more than feathers and prayers to protect them.
Michelle tells how water protectors are in jail, and some are waiting trial or sentencing.
Since Standing Rock, there have been 58 bills introduced to deny free speech and assembly.
Who pays for it? Energy Transfer Partners gave $15 million to North Dakota.
If we can not find justice in the United States, we need to go to the international justice system, Michelle said.
While at Standing Rock, Michelle received death threats, but the threats only made her more determined.
"We have also been going to the banks," she said, describing the divestment efforts of the financial institutions who invest in Dakota Access Pipeline and fossil fuels.
Now, Michelle asked how water protectors can seek help for post traumatic stress syndrome.
In the report just released, attorneys urge that criminal charges be dropped against water protectors, and there be reparations for victims.
She also describes the role of the media.
"We have to create our own media," she said, adding that the media has been compromised.
"We are threatened with extinction."
Indigenous Peoples are the ones protecting the land.
"That is who I am."
"We realized who we are."
Now, she said, "We need action."
Michelle said she is thankful for what has happened.
"It changed my life for the better."
"We are not going to give up."
"We are going to work harder."
The report, “Indigenous Resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline: Criminalization of 

Dissent and Suppression of Protest,” makes the following recommendations:

  • Drop all criminal charges against the water protectors
  • Investigate, punish, and provide appropriate reparations for all human rights violations, including the use of excessive force and mass arrests in response to DAPL opposition; OR convene a truth commission with the indigenous representative institutions of the Oceti Šakowiŋ
  • Adopt a regulatory framework to supervise and monitor activities of extractive industries and energy companies, private security firms and other non-state actors to prevent human rights violations in regard to activities that affect indigenous peoples and their lands
  • Provide training to law enforcement and private security on best practices for managing peaceful demonstrations; the right to free expression and assembly; and indigenous peoples rights under international law
  • Implement national measures to protect indigenous human rights defenders in compliance with the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and other international standards to ensure the full enjoyment of their rights to free expression and assembly
  • Regulate/restrict transfer of military-grade weapons and equipment to local law enforcement
  • Direct prosecutors to seek proportionate penalties for protestors who violate the law
  • Reject or amend state legislation that violates the right to free assembly

Thursday, April 19, 2018:

https://www.facebook.com/CampOfTheSacredStone/videos/2077628722526155/


Dakota Access Pipeline Resistance and the Criminalization of Indigenous Human Rights Defenders

By Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy, University of Arizona
Event: Thursday, April 19, 2:45–4 PM
United Nations Secretariat Building, New York
(Room S-2725 BR)
IPLP is convening a panel of experts to discuss the criminalization of peaceful protest as part of United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII). The event is titled “Dakota Access Pipeline Resistance and the Criminalization of Indigenous Human Rights Defenders,” and takes place April 19, 2:45–4 PM PM at the United Nations Secretariat Building (Room S-2725 BR).
The event will feature leading human rights scholars and activists who will discuss the criminalization of indigenous activists and the need for protection of indigenous human rights defenders worldwide. If you are attending UNPFII, join IPLP for a critical discussion on the criminalization of indigenous human rights defenders worldwide.
The panelists for the event are:
Victoria Tauli-Corpuz (United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples)
Victoria Tauli-Corpuz is an indigenous leader from the Kankanaey Igorot people of the Cordillera Region in the Philippines. She is a social development consultant, indigenous activist, civic leader, human rights expert, public servant, and an advocate of women's rights in the Philippines. She was the former Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (2005-2010). As an indigenous leader she got actively engaged in drafting and adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. She helped build the indigenous peoples' movement in the Cordillera as a youth activist in the early 1970s. She helped organize indigenous peoples in the community level to fight against the projects of the Marcos Dictatorship such as the Chico River Hydroelectric Dam and the Cellophil Resources Corporation. These communities succeeded in stopping these.
Elifuraha Laltaika (Member, United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues)
Elifuraha Laltaika is the executive director of association for law and advocacy for pastoralists (ALAPA) and a law lecturer of Tumaini University Makumira (Arusha, Tanzania). He previously served as a Harvard Law School visiting researcher. He holds a Doctorate in Law from the University of Arizona Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program. Elifuraha is an expert member of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) and a member of the Tanzanian national Bar association (Tanganyika Law Society). Mr. Laltaika has 10 year’s experience working on indigenous peoples’ issues, including as senior fellow at OHCHR in Geneva. He is currently employed as a Lecturer in Law in Tanzania.
Seanna Howard (Professor, University of Arizona, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program)
Seánna Howard teaches International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples and the International Human Rights Advocacy Workshop. Professor Howard has been with the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program since 2006, representing indigenous communities on precedent setting cases before the Inter-American and United Nations human rights systems.
Carla Fredericks (Professor, University of Colorado, Boulder School of Law)
Carla Fredericks is Director of the American Indian Law Clinic and Director of the American Indian Law Program (AILP), which serves as the umbrella organization for Colorado Law's academic, practice-focused, and community outreach activities in American Indian law.  She is a graduate of the University of Colorado and Columbia Law School. At Colorado Law, Fredericks leads a year-long clinic in which students have the opportunity to represent American Indian tribes, organizations, and individuals in a variety of matters, designed to ready students for the complexities of general counsel work. Fredericks is also of counsel to Fredericks, Peebles and Morgan LLP, where she focuses on complex and appellate litigation and Native American affairs, representing Indian tribes and organizations in a variety of litigation and policy matters.
LaDonna Brave Bull Allard (Sacred Stone Camp Founder)
LaDonna Brave Bull Allard is a mother, Lakota historian, land-owner along the Dakota Access Pipeline route, and the founder of Sacred Stone Camp, the first prayerful resistance camp opened as part of the movement to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota. By December 2016, more than 10,000 Indigenous people and environmental activists were camping in the area on and around LaDonna’s home. She has been a major catalyst and leader in the Standing Rock movement, which has become the perhaps the largest ever intertribal alliance on the American continent, with over 200 Indigenous nations represented. With most Standing Rock defenders now departed from her land - LaDonna remains as a ceaseless voice for her people, the Earth and the water - sharing her story and calls to action at platforms around the world as she continues to advocate for justice. Allard is an enrolled member of, and former historical preservation officer for, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Her people are Inhunktonwan from the Jamestown Valley, Hunkpapa and Blackfoot.
Michelle Cook (SJD Candidate, IPLP)
Michelle Cook is an indigenous human rights lawyer and SJD candidate at Arizona Law’s Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) Program. She is writing her dissertation on international law, indigenous people’s human rights, gender, sexuality, and indigenous transnationalism. She is a founding member of the Water Protector Legal Collective, the on-the-ground legal team which provides legal services to those arrested at the Standing Rock encampment.
Kanyinke Sena (Member, African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights)
Kanjinke currently serves as Member of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations/Communities in Africa (Working Group). A member of the Ogiek indigenous community of Kenya, Kanyinke is a long-time advocate for inclusionary approaches to conservation policy and indigenous peoples’ rights in Africa. He currently serves as a Professor of Law at Egerton University in Kenya. Prior to his role as Member of the Working Group, Kanyinke served as chair of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues from 2013–14.